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368 Items.  Showing Items 19 thru 27.
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A Fine Association Of Banker August Belmont And Civil War General Daniel Sickels

 SICKLES, DANIEL E.
AUGUST BELMONT (1813-1890) Financier; Diplomat. At the age of fourteen, Belmont began working at the office of the Rothschilds in Frankfurt, Germany. His skill for finance won him numerous promotions within the company until in 1837, during the financial panic, he formed his own company in New York with his only tangible asset being that of his agency in the U.S. for the Rothschilds. Within a few years, Belmont was one of the leading bankers in the nation.Partially PRitned “Bank of the Metropolis” Check Signed on verso, “August Belmont.” Check is also signed as maker by DANIEL SICKLES (1819-1914) American soldier and diplomat. 8” x 2 3/4”. New York. January 28, 1884. Orange revevenu underprint. “Certified Stamp of the Metropolis” stamp at left edge. Punch and pen cancelled. Very Fine. This item has been encapsulated by PASS-CO and is accompanied by a Certified Silver PASS. Fine.
Catalog: # AM-1357
Topic: Signed Checks
Price: $350.00

A Fine Content Letter Detailing The Loss Of Equipment During A Charge By A Regiment Of Colored Troops Signed By Four Black Soldiers

[Civil War – Black Soldiers]. Camp 1st U. S. Colored Troops In the Field Va Nov. 12th/64 I certify on honor, that on the 27th day of October 1864 at and in the vicinity of White Oaks before Richmond Va, the articles enumerated below were lost, under the following circumstances. The Regt. to which my company belongs after a severe march from 5 a.m. to a short time before sundown being almost constantly on foot took up a position on the extreme right of the 18th Army Corps in their recent movement on the left of the enemy’s line before Richmond Va. After running considerable distance the Regt. deployed in thick under brush and moved at the same gait for considerable distance by the flank to our right, the men being by this time nearly exhausted, into an open field. About half a mile to our left was the Rebel line of works, which opened immediately with a battery upon us. We then fronted to the left and charged the works, which were carried, with two pieces of Artillery. We were however ordered to retire, as the rebels were massing upon our flank and we had no supports; In the charge many of the men were compelled to throw away their extra trappings to keep up, while others lost theirs by the breakage of the fastenings. In the charge Two men were killed and ten wounded belonging to my company. Our dead and severely wounded were left on the field, those that were helped off, lost their (??) as they had to be helped along for considerable distance before army ambulances could be found. The following is a list of the articles so lost. (17) Seventeen Haversocks (13) Thirteen Canteens (2) Two Shelter Tents (2) Two Pairs Great Coat Straps Nathan L. Bishop The regiment was organized in the District of Columbia in May and June of 1863. The incident detailed within this letter took place during the Battle of Fair Oaks. While a retained copy, the letter is signed at the conclusion by four Black soldiers, 1st Lieut. Nathan L. Bishop, and three sergeants, Henry Green, Robert Bouldin and John Ross An exceptional letter detailing colored troops at the during the Battle of Fair Oaks and signed by four Black soldiers.
Catalog: # AM-1680
State: Virginia
Topic: Civil War
Price: $575.00

A Fine Early Massachusetts Land Transaction Signed by these three Promiment Massachusetts People – John Weld, William Dudley and Samuel Gerrish

William Dudley (1686 – 1743) a man of brilliant talents, which he exercised both in civil and military life. At the age of twenty he was sent on a most important and delicate mission to Canada, to negotiate an exchange of prisoners. Son of Joseph Dudley Colonial Governor of Massachusetts Bay Colony from 1702 to 1715. Samuel Gerrish. Publisher, bookseller. A strong advocate of the Regular Singing Movement in Boston during the 1720’s. John Weld. Member of the prominent Weld family of Massachusetts. “Whereas my honoured Granfather Joseph Weld of Roxbury has recorded to him in the records of Roxbury, two hundred & seventy eight acres in the four thousand granted to Roxbury by reason of Dedham, ( ) them as may be seen by the records of the town and general court and John Weld being the only surviving grandchild of the said Joseph have & Do by these presents convey and make over to my cosin Joseph Weld of Roxbury all my right, title or interest in the said two hundred & seventy eight acres or what may be granted to me on the petition now to be preferred to the honorable court to have & to hold the same to the said Joseph Weld his heirs & assigns forever. As witness my hand & seal this 24th Novr. 1736…Signed by John Weld at the conclusion and witnessed at left by Sarah Weld. William Dudley has signed below indicating that John Weld appeared “and acknowledged this instrument as his voluntary act & deed” John Weld signs again on the following page “It is agreed by & between the parties within …John and Joseph Weld that in case of any heirs of the first named Joseph except the within grantor shall recover any right or part in the within granted…the said John or his heirs will repay to Joseph, his heirs or assigns the one half of the consideration money…John Weld. Below, Prominent Bostonian Samuel Gerrish signs recording the transaction. A superb association of prominent Massachusetts individuals signing a single land memorandum document.
Catalog: # AM-0042
State: Massachusetts
Price: $750.00

A Fine William Green Letter On American Federation Of Labor Letterhead

William Green (1873 - 1952) Second long-term president of the American Federation of Labor, serving from 1924 until his death in 1942.TLS. 1 page. 8 1/2” x 11”. On imprinted American Federation of Labor Letterhead. Washington, D.C. December 12, 1945. Addressed to Mr. Harold Sherwin of Rosalia, Washington. “Dear Mr. Sherwin: I acknowledge receipt of the letter dated November 30th signed by you and other members of the Adult Bible Class of the Rosalia Methodist Church. I cannot believe that you mean to convey the idea that wage proposals submitted by different groups of labor are unreasonable and unjustifiable. In this letter, however, you and your associates do not draw the line between reasonable and unreasonable proposals. Very truly yours, Wm. Green President American Federation of Labor.” A choice example for display.
Catalog: # AM-1585
State: District Of Columbia
Topic: Social History
Price: $125.00

A John Wanamaker Autograph Note Signed

 WANAMAKER, JOHN
John Wanamaker. ANS. 1pp. 8" x 13". Philadelphia. Nov 13, 1899. An autograph note signed by famed merchant John Wanamaker that states: "To The Real Estate Trust Co of Philadelphia Please deliver above Bonds to Mr. Williams & take his receipt for the same & Oblige Jno Wanamaker". There is a typed statement above: "RECEIVED of John Wanamaker Twenty five thousand dollars in Lehigh Valley Railroad Company Trust fives, to be held in trust by this Company as collateral for payment of rewards for detection of offences under his proposition made public this date. Said Bonds to be returned on surrender of this receipt one year from date." The document is in very fine condition overall.
Catalog: # AM-0289
Topic: Business
Price: $250.00

A Photograph Signed By Circus Attraction Anna Eliza Leak

 LEAK, ANNA ELIZA
ANNA ELIZA LEAK. ISP. 2 1/2" x 4 1/4". n.p. Aug. 24, 1871. A carte-de-visite signed and inscribed on the verso by Leak: "I write poetry & prose holding my pen between my toes. Ann E. Leak Born without arms age 29 years Georgia Aug. 24, 1871." The photograph shows her sitting on a counter with her bare feet on a silver tea service. Considering the circumstances, the writing is incredibly neat, dark and legible. She performed this routine in the same shows that featured Tom Thumb, among other noteworthy attractions. It was Barnum who invented the concept of the sideshow as a source of additional income, and also he who merged his "Hall of Human Oddities" with his circus. It is quite rare to see remnants of Barnum's spectacles, save those of Tom Thumb, in our age. The item shows some wear around the edges, but is in fine condition overall, and a reminder of what passed for entertainment years ago.
Catalog: # AM-0459
Topic: Signed Photographs
Price: $350.00

A Proxy Document Signed By Edward Swift

EDWARD F. SWIFT (d. 1932). A son of Gustavus Swift Sr, the founder of Swift and Company, Edward served as president of Compania Swift Internacional, S.A. and Swift Refrigerator Transportation Co. He also served as vice president of Swift and Company and a director of numerous corporations. A "Proxy and Waiver Irving National Bank" document signed "Edward F. Swift". The document assigned several other men to vote for Swift at the stockholders' meeting. It is in Fine condition, with the exception of two pin holes with a dark signature and a 10 cent red Document stamp.
Catalog: # AM-1167
Topic: Famous People on Stocks and Bonds
Price: $45.00

A Rare Autograph Of Early Printer Solomon Southwick

[The James Franklin Printing Press] In 1717, James Franklin, older brother of Benjamin Franklin, returned home to Boston afer serving as a printer’s apprentice in England. He brought with him this printing press. Made in London of unseasoned English elm, probably about 1650, the press proved to be rugged enough to take over a century’s worth of continuous hard work. It was a “common press,” designed to be dismantled for easy transport. Upon his return to Boston with the press, James Franklin established one of the first newspapers in the American colonies, The New England Courant. Soon Franklin’s younger brother, Benjamin was place with Jams as an apprentice by their father. This relationship turned sour, however, and Benjamin ended his apprenticeship early by running away to Philadelphia.The strong political views that James expressed in the editorials of the Courant provoked the Boson authorities to censor him. Like so many before him, rather than submit to their authority, he left the restrictive atmosphere of Massachusetts and came to the more tolerant Rhode Island in 1725. James Franklin created printing history when he arrived in Newport. He became the most prolific printer in Rhode Island printing the currency of the colony, The Acts and Resolves of the General assembly, hundreds of broadsides, almanacs, and countless other printed pieces. He established Rhode Island’s first-if shore lived- newspaper, the Rhode Island Gazette, which was published between 1732 and 1733.By 1733, Benjamin Franklin had established himself as a printer in Philadelphia. James Franklin died in 1735, and Benjamin Franklin took his nephew, James Franklin, Jr., as his apprentice. Young James remained with his uncle until he was old enough to return to Newport and take over management of him family’s shop in 1748. In the meantime, Anne Franklin, James’ widow, and her daughter took over the shop.In 1758, after James, Jr. returned from Philadelphia, the Franklin family established the Newport mercury, which has been in continuous publication to this day. It is now published by the Sherman Family who also publishes the Newport Daily News, James Jr. died in 1762 and his mother once again took over the printing operation, this time with her son-in-law Samuel Hall.In 1768, Hall sol the press and the business to Solomon Southwick. In July 1776 Southwick printed copies of the Declaration of Independence for all the towns of Rhode Island. Southwick continued using the press until the American Revolution. During the war, Solomon Southwick buried part of the Franklin Press behind his house on Broadway in an attempt to hide from the British. A local Tory informed on Southwick and the British dug up the press for their own use during their occupation of the city.
Catalog: # AM-1330
State: Rhode Island
Topic: Colonial America
Price: $500.00

A Rare Ebenezer Breed Document, Owner Of Breed’s Hill, The Site of The Battle of Bunker Hill

Ebenezer Breed. American merchant and owner of Charlestown’s Breed’s Hill. It was upon Breed’s Hill that much of the Battle of Bunker Hill was fought. Autograph Document Signed, “Ebenr Breed,” internally. One page. No place. 1774. Breed writes: “Mr. Baker to Ebenr Breed To the hire of a horse & shay to Salem ₤4.10.0 To a horse & sulky to Medford and Cambridge and to Jamaca [sic] to Call a Councill & Expenses 4.0.0 ₤8.10.0.” Pen notation at lower edge identifies Breed as owner of Breed’s Hill. Usual folds, some very light toning to left edge, else Very Fine.
Catalog: # RN-283
State: Massachusetts
Topic: American Revolution
Price: $1250.00

368 Items.  Showing Items 19 thru 27.
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