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272 Items.  Showing Items 10 thru 18.
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A Detailed First Hand Account of Meeting William Henry Harrison During The Campaign Which Brought Him To The Presidency In 1841

[William Henry Harrison]. Choice content letter.8" x 12 1/2". Sec. 54, Wabas & Erie Canal, June 14, 1840. “Dear Father, On the 11th instant I spent the day on and about (?) where we had a splendid Whig celebration, at least 20,000 (?), among the member present was Gen William H Harrison, Thomas Ewing, Thomas Corwin and many other worthy Whigs from N.Y. City to far West of this. I spent and hour in the morning with Harrison at this lodging found him very agreeable and pleasant in private. While there in the morning the delegation from western Pennsylvania called on him amounting to about 40 or 50 persons presented him with a very valuable coin and among their number was four persons who had fought under him at Tipecanoe __ and the Thames. After which he addressed them in the most appropriate terms, tendering his sincere thanks for the valuable article thus presented said the mottos on it were to him very gratifying and he hope and trusted it would be support to him during the ballance of his life and that Pennsylvania was remembered by him with heartfelt gratitude that in the hour of battle her aid was ___ by the best of soldiers and other mercenaries and in peace he had not been forgotten by her and to the four soldiers present he expressed himself under many and deep obligations and gratitude and hope their latter days me be as happy as they merited. And on the date I heard him speak to the assembly one and a half or two hours and I do assure you he is one of the smartest old Gent.  I am acquainted with he appears ____ mind clear voice good and the Whig sentiments by him delivered were not to be beat. I think the impression he made on the minds of the assembly by his personal attendance were very favorable to his election. I pursuance however much handle will he made of it by opposers. When I lived in Maine I thought it ridiculous for a candidate to come out and make stump speeches etc. as they are accustomed to do in this country but the more I see of it the more reconciled I become to it. Now in Harrison’s speech he labored much to show the importance of our form of government over any others and the necessity of the watchfulness and care over it. And an attention to prudence in every department of government as also with corporations, associations, and even individuals. He referred to much that he considered miss rule or management of the present and past administration and also alluded to the promises made by them and the manner they have been kept. And then refered to the impropriety of presidential candidates making promises as they might be made to suit the present occassion and kept as those of the past executors. He thought the history of a person political principals together with the character they have formed or sustained were the surist guarantee. He provided I think to the mind of every candid person present that when the sub treasury bill and the militia bill now before congress should pass what the executive in the chair would possess every power and attribute necessary to entitle and constitute him a monarch whatever might be his style. And I think assembly much awakened on the subject. I will endeavor soon to send you a paper soon containing a more full description of the celebration speeches etc. than I can give you. One thing however I must mention those the General was dressed in domestick cloth much as you would expect from a perfectly independent prudent farmer and while speaking on the fact oh- his hard cider out of a 2 qt. brown earthen pitcher. I look for a change in our administration and think it necessary and worth attending to. I handed him a copy of the genealogy of our ancestors and desired if he had any knowledge of them to leave me a note but have rec'd none. Summer is extremely warm and vegetation _____ on the 11th last I saw new hay in markets and on the 11th new potatoes. Crops appear promising except wheat which is injured much with the flies, so much sop that wheat has risen lately __ per bush. I am pursuing my canal work with a force of about 50 men and expect to finish in Oct next. I expect this canal job the most lasting monument of my exertions that I shall have to generations to come. And it would give me much satisfaction for you to see it once. The health of my family is good and my own tolerable. I have been a little inside up with exertion and canals fare (I board in a shanty away the men and love differently from what I should as you know I am a baby about my food like pies, cake etc. but am now better. Hoping yourself, Mam and all our relations are enjoying the best of health said other blessings. Please write me soon, Robert".

William Henry Harrison was the ninth President of the United States and an American military officer. His military involvement is highlighted by serving as a U.S. General during the War of 1812. Politically, he held a series of positions before being elected President. These positions include U.S. Senator, U.S. Minister to Colombia, and Secretary of the Northwest Territory. This letter was an account of a firsthand meeting with Harrison, focusing heavily on a “Whig Celebration” that the author was at. The letter covers details about Harrison as an individual that are candid and unique interpretations of Harrison. The letter is written between father and son and offers a superb detailed first person account of time spent with Harrison during his campaign. Some discoloration.

Catalog: # AM-3022
Topic: Presidents and First Ladies
Price: $1250.00

A Document Signed By Thomas Gibbons The Man Who Won The Important Gibbons Vs Ogden Anti-Trust Suit, Effectively Destroying The New York Steamboat Monopoly

 GIBBONS, THOMAS
THOMAS GIBBONS (1757 - 1826). Gibbons was a lawyer, politician, and steamboat operator. He is best remembered as the plaintiff in the famous Giggons Vs Ogden anti-trust suit whereby Chief Justice John Marshall handed down one of his most famous decisions nulling many monopolies. DS 1 pp 7"x 3 1/4". New York 15th Aug. 1803. A partly printed “Manhattan Company” check signed “Th Gibbons”. He paid “--” $100.00. There is a small woodcut vignette of a male figure seated on the ground. Bank cut cancellations, but not affecting signature. Gibbons is a highly important figure in American business history and a rare autograph
Catalog: # AM-0311
Topic: Signed Checks
Price: $450.00

A Fabulous Pro-union Civil War Poem Entitled "Our Union"

CIVIL WAR. MD. 2pp. 4" x 7 1/2". n.p. n.d. A manuscript poem entitled "Our Union" supporting the Union cause: "Dissolve this mighty Union / Go stop you rolling sun / Blot out the planets from this sphere / Which now in oder run / Go stop the raging billows / Go calm the raging sea / And then this mighty Union / May be dissolved by thee / Dissolve this happy Union / Command our Good to sleep / And cause the sons of Freedom / In bitterness to weep / But hark they say with one accord / This blessed land shall shine / The Freedom of this Country / Be preserved by power divine / Dissolve this matchless Union / Oh what a wicked thought / The blast this mighty structure / That was so dearly bought / Dissolve the starry Union / Go hide your shameful heads / Behold the mighty hand of God / Her spangled Banner spreads / Dissolve this wide spread Union / Her mountains on your frown / Volcanoes in their fiery mist / In floods to sweep your down / But hark from every State the sound / Of union still is heard / Her countless sons assemble round / Their banners at a word". The poem is in very fine condition with white paper and dark ink. Though the writer is unknown, the spirit is apparent and moving.
Catalog: # AM-0181
Topic: Content Letters
Price: $225.00

A Fine Association Of Banker August Belmont And Civil War General Daniel Sickels

 SICKLES, DANIEL E.
AUGUST BELMONT (1813-1890) Financier; Diplomat. At the age of fourteen, Belmont began working at the office of the Rothschilds in Frankfurt, Germany. His skill for finance won him numerous promotions within the company until in 1837, during the financial panic, he formed his own company in New York with his only tangible asset being that of his agency in the U.S. for the Rothschilds. Within a few years, Belmont was one of the leading bankers in the nation.Partially PRitned “Bank of the Metropolis” Check Signed on verso, “August Belmont.” Check is also signed as maker by DANIEL SICKLES (1819-1914) American soldier and diplomat. 8” x 2 3/4”. New York. January 28, 1884. Orange revevenu underprint. “Certified Stamp of the Metropolis” stamp at left edge. Punch and pen cancelled. Very Fine. This item has been encapsulated by PASS-CO and is accompanied by a Certified Silver PASS. Fine.
Catalog: # AM-1357
Topic: Signed Checks
Price: $350.00

A Fine Content Letter Detailing The Loss Of Equipment During A Charge By A Regiment Of Colored Troops Signed By Four Black Soldiers

[Civil War – Black Soldiers]. Camp 1st U. S. Colored Troops In the Field Va Nov. 12th/64 I certify on honor, that on the 27th day of October 1864 at and in the vicinity of White Oaks before Richmond Va, the articles enumerated below were lost, under the following circumstances. The Regt. to which my company belongs after a severe march from 5 a.m. to a short time before sundown being almost constantly on foot took up a position on the extreme right of the 18th Army Corps in their recent movement on the left of the enemy’s line before Richmond Va. After running considerable distance the Regt. deployed in thick under brush and moved at the same gait for considerable distance by the flank to our right, the men being by this time nearly exhausted, into an open field. About half a mile to our left was the Rebel line of works, which opened immediately with a battery upon us. We then fronted to the left and charged the works, which were carried, with two pieces of Artillery. We were however ordered to retire, as the rebels were massing upon our flank and we had no supports; In the charge many of the men were compelled to throw away their extra trappings to keep up, while others lost theirs by the breakage of the fastenings. In the charge Two men were killed and ten wounded belonging to my company. Our dead and severely wounded were left on the field, those that were helped off, lost their (??) as they had to be helped along for considerable distance before army ambulances could be found. The following is a list of the articles so lost. (17) Seventeen Haversocks (13) Thirteen Canteens (2) Two Shelter Tents (2) Two Pairs Great Coat Straps Nathan L. Bishop The regiment was organized in the District of Columbia in May and June of 1863. The incident detailed within this letter took place during the Battle of Fair Oaks. While a retained copy, the letter is signed at the conclusion by four Black soldiers, 1st Lieut. Nathan L. Bishop, and three sergeants, Henry Green, Robert Bouldin and John Ross An exceptional letter detailing colored troops at the during the Battle of Fair Oaks and signed by four Black soldiers.
Catalog: # AM-1680
State: Virginia
Topic: Civil War
Price: $575.00

A Fine Early Massachusetts Land Transaction Signed by these three Promiment Massachusetts People – John Weld, William Dudley and Samuel Gerrish

William Dudley (1686 – 1743) a man of brilliant talents, which he exercised both in civil and military life. At the age of twenty he was sent on a most important and delicate mission to Canada, to negotiate an exchange of prisoners. Son of Joseph Dudley Colonial Governor of Massachusetts Bay Colony from 1702 to 1715. Samuel Gerrish. Publisher, bookseller. A strong advocate of the Regular Singing Movement in Boston during the 1720’s. John Weld. Member of the prominent Weld family of Massachusetts. “Whereas my honoured Granfather Joseph Weld of Roxbury has recorded to him in the records of Roxbury, two hundred & seventy eight acres in the four thousand granted to Roxbury by reason of Dedham, ( ) them as may be seen by the records of the town and general court and John Weld being the only surviving grandchild of the said Joseph have & Do by these presents convey and make over to my cosin Joseph Weld of Roxbury all my right, title or interest in the said two hundred & seventy eight acres or what may be granted to me on the petition now to be preferred to the honorable court to have & to hold the same to the said Joseph Weld his heirs & assigns forever. As witness my hand & seal this 24th Novr. 1736…Signed by John Weld at the conclusion and witnessed at left by Sarah Weld. William Dudley has signed below indicating that John Weld appeared “and acknowledged this instrument as his voluntary act & deed” John Weld signs again on the following page “It is agreed by & between the parties within …John and Joseph Weld that in case of any heirs of the first named Joseph except the within grantor shall recover any right or part in the within granted…the said John or his heirs will repay to Joseph, his heirs or assigns the one half of the consideration money…John Weld. Below, Prominent Bostonian Samuel Gerrish signs recording the transaction. A superb association of prominent Massachusetts individuals signing a single land memorandum document.
Catalog: # AM-0042
State: Massachusetts
Price: $750.00

A Fine William Green Letter On American Federation Of Labor Letterhead

William Green (1873 - 1952) Second long-term president of the American Federation of Labor, serving from 1924 until his death in 1942.TLS. 1 page. 8 1/2” x 11”. On imprinted American Federation of Labor Letterhead. Washington, D.C. December 12, 1945. Addressed to Mr. Harold Sherwin of Rosalia, Washington. “Dear Mr. Sherwin: I acknowledge receipt of the letter dated November 30th signed by you and other members of the Adult Bible Class of the Rosalia Methodist Church. I cannot believe that you mean to convey the idea that wage proposals submitted by different groups of labor are unreasonable and unjustifiable. In this letter, however, you and your associates do not draw the line between reasonable and unreasonable proposals. Very truly yours, Wm. Green President American Federation of Labor.” A choice example for display.
Catalog: # AM-1585
State: District Of Columbia
Topic: Social History
Price: $125.00

A John Wanamaker Autograph Note Signed

 WANAMAKER, JOHN
John Wanamaker. ANS. 1pp. 8" x 13". Philadelphia. Nov 13, 1899. An autograph note signed by famed merchant John Wanamaker that states: "To The Real Estate Trust Co of Philadelphia Please deliver above Bonds to Mr. Williams & take his receipt for the same & Oblige Jno Wanamaker". There is a typed statement above: "RECEIVED of John Wanamaker Twenty five thousand dollars in Lehigh Valley Railroad Company Trust fives, to be held in trust by this Company as collateral for payment of rewards for detection of offences under his proposition made public this date. Said Bonds to be returned on surrender of this receipt one year from date." The document is in very fine condition overall.
Catalog: # AM-0289
Topic: Business
Price: $250.00

A Proxy Document Signed By Edward Swift

EDWARD F. SWIFT (d. 1932). A son of Gustavus Swift Sr, the founder of Swift and Company, Edward served as president of Compania Swift Internacional, S.A. and Swift Refrigerator Transportation Co. He also served as vice president of Swift and Company and a director of numerous corporations. A "Proxy and Waiver Irving National Bank" document signed "Edward F. Swift". The document assigned several other men to vote for Swift at the stockholders' meeting. It is in Fine condition, with the exception of two pin holes with a dark signature and a 10 cent red Document stamp.
Catalog: # AM-1167
Topic: Famous People on Stocks and Bonds
Price: $45.00

272 Items.  Showing Items 10 thru 18.
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