Historical Americana


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110 Items.  Showing Items 10 thru 18.
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A Rare Quaker Circular Advising All Quakers On Petitioning To Avoid The Draft During The Civil War

[Quaker – Civil War Draft]. 8 ˝” x 14”. Partly-printed circular, “At a Special Representative Meeting held in New York, 6th of Eighth month, 1863. A detailed discussion of the Draft during the Civil War with directions as to how Quakers should react when drafted for service in the military. A sample letter to be sent to the Board of Enrollment by a Quaker is provided; “The undersigned is informed that his name is included in the list of persons reported to be drafted in – for service in the army of the U.S. He respectfully represents that he is a member of the Religious Society of Friends, (commonly called Quakers,) and is conscientiously scrupulous against bearing arms, or being otherwise concerned in war; and he therefore cannot conform to the draft, procure a substitute, nor pay the sum provided by law, or any other sum as a commutation for Military service. In this matter he is not actuated by any disloyalty to our Government, no duty, in obedience to what he believes to be the plain commands of the Gospel. On this ground, he respectfully asks that his case may be favorably considered in order to such relief as may, by competent authority, be deemed just.” Much additional detail and advice as to the procedures to be followed when subjected to judicial punishment and trial for non-compliance to a draft order. Singed in type by various Quaker representatives throughout New York. A choice Quaker related item displaying their anti-war philosophy published during the Civil War. Folds. A very scarce Quaker item. Extremely Fine.
Catalog: # AA-0264
State: New York
Topic: Civil War
Price: $450.00

A Rare Tin J. I. Case Advertising Sign

20” x 13 ˝”. Produced by The Tuscarora Advertising Company in Coshocton, Ohio. An awesome image of an early J. I. Case Tractor which is embossed into the lithographed tin sign produced for the J. I. Case Threshing Machine Company. In 1904, the company produced it’s first steel thresher, a product which flourished well after 1910 so this sign would have been produced during this period. The condition of this is rather extraordinary as tin signs from this period are often found with heavy surface damage. While this does exhibit some flaws, overall it is a well above average example of a rare advertising sign. It is currently matted and easily removed.
Catalog: # AA-0002
Condition: Extremely Fine
Topic: Advertising
Price: $6500.00

A Scarce Antebellum Shipping Broadside

Printed Document. 12” x 17 ˝”. Printed by the Journal Steam Press, Wilmington, N.C. No date. The poster advertises a regular freight line running from Wilmington, N.C., to New York and states the cost of shipping cotton is $1.50 per a bale. Extremely Fine.
Catalog: # AM-1043
Topic: Broadsides
Price: $575.00

A SOLDIER RECEIVES HIS PAY FOR SERVING IN THE CONTINENTAL ARMY

[American Revolution]. Hartford, July 3, 1783. Partly-printed Pay-Table Committee Order to pay a soldier for serving in the Connecticut Line of the Continental Army. Accompanied by a manuscript certification of military service of Ebenezer Grow who “”was a soldier in the late Regt. Commanded by Colo. Henry Sherburn for the term of three years..” Signed by John Trowbridge, selectman of Pomfret, Connecticut. The pay order is signed by Seth Grosvenor who served under Col. Samuel McClellan “troop of horse”.
Catalog: # AM-3624
State: Connecticut
Topic: American Revolution
Price: $145.00

A SOLDIER RECEIVES HIS PAY FOR SERVING IN THE CONTINENTAL ARMY

[American Revolution]. Hartford, September 13, 1780. Partly-printed Pay-Table Committee Order to pay a soldier for serving in the Connecticut Line of the Continental Army. Accompanied by a manuscript certification of military service of Peter Graves who “has served as a soldier in the Connecticut Line of Continental Army for the term of three years.” Signed by the selectmen of Colchester, Connecticut.
Catalog: # AM-3625
Price: $145.00

A SOLDIER RECEIVES HIS PAY FOR SERVING IN THE CONTINENTAL ARMY

Catalog: # AM-3626
State: Connecticut
Topic: American Revolution
Price: $145.00

A Superb Printed Silk Broadside Of Andrew Jackson's Farewell Address

[ANDREW JACKSON]. A large printed silk broadside displaying the entire text of Andrew Jackson's Farewell Address to the American People. Jackson delivered the address on March 4, 1837 upon his retirement from the presidency. A couple of minor splits and light repair. Fine.
Catalog: # AA-0179
Price: $1900.00

Abstract From The Returns Of Maine Banks

Printed Document. One page, 20” x 16”. Maine. October 1847. The document lists the Bank’s date of incorporation, funds due from each bank, resources of each bank and dividends, reserved profits and so forth for each bank. Usual folds. One slight pin hole at center fold. Extremely Fine.
Catalog: # AA-0099
Topic: Financial
Price: $125.00

Abstract Of Provisions For The Hospital At Florida’s Fort Barrancas

Partially Printed Document One page, 20 ˝” x 17”. Fort Barrancas, Florida, 3rd Regiment of Artillery, Fort Hospital. September 1871. This abstract of requisitions lists a variety of provisions (Pork, Salt Beef, Fresh Beef, Flour, Beans, Rice Coffee, Tea, Sugar, Vinegar, Adaman Candles, Soap, Salt, and Pepper) needed for the sick and wounded soldiers in the Fort Barrancas Hospital. Fort Barrancas was the site of numerous conflicts before it was deactivated in 1947. During the War of 1812, General Andrew Jackson commanded American forces during a small battle between British, Spanish and American forces at the then Spanish controlled fort. In 1818, Andrew Jackson successfully forced the Spanish to surrender the fort to American forces after several days of artillery barrages. Once in American hands, the fort was expanded to defend against both ships entering Pensacola Bay and against land forces. During the Civil War, Confederate forces took control of Fort Barrancas, forcing Union troops to retreat to nearby Fort Pickens. Confederate forces under General Bragg retained control of Fort Barrancas until news of the Union capture of New Orleans reached them, leading the Confederate troops to abandon Pensacola entirely. The fort continued to serve as a signal station, small arms range, and storage area until new weapon technology led to the deactivation of the fort in 1947. In 1980, the fort, now part of the Gulf Islands National Seashore, was opened to the public.
Catalog: # AA-0276
State: Florida
Topic: Military History
Price: $90.00

110 Items.  Showing Items 10 thru 18.
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